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EMu and insect pest trapping data

EMu and insect pest trapping data

This may appear completely out of context on this forum, but please bear with me……

As a relatively new member to the EMu Users Community, the Natural History Museum, London would like to know, firstly how other institutes were recording insect trapping data as part of a pest management programme – what information, and in what software? We would be especially interested to know if other institutes were using EMu as a repository for insect trapping data.
Secondly, if EMu isn’t currently being used would they consider it if the system were developed to accommodate such data??

Over the past 5 years, the Natural History Museum in London has successfully implemented an integrated approach to Pest Management. No longer is it just the Life Science curators who are concerned with monitoring insect pest distributions within their collection areas. Our holistic approach means that every member of staff has a role to play in their everyday activities in reducing the risks to the collections and displays (and furniture, upholstery and general Museum infrastructure) from insects and rodents.
Each Science department (Yes! Even the Earth Sciences!!) and the Exhibition department now records the insect pest distribution in their collection areas, and on display, on at least a monthly basis (fortnightly during the summer). We have piloted a project using a Spatial Analysis program to visualise this data superimposed on the plans of the Museum, with great success. One can immediately see where in the Museum there are ‘hot spots’ and temporal patterns and thus act accordingly. We later plan to superimpose other sources of data, such as T/H from a wireless networked Environmental Monitoring System to provide us with as much information about the factors that may be influencing pest distributions within the Museum.

In collaboration with the Integrated Pest Management Working Group (see www.MuseumPest.net) we are looking at a range of spatial software that will allow us (and the Museum community) to visualise and query our data using a much simpler interface than many of the professional packages. One of the options I’m toying with, and I’ve yet to really quiz the developers as to whether this could be a possibility, is to use EMu as our data repository and use the Object Locator and/or Web Maps Modules to mimic the functionality of a professional spatial analysis software.
The Natural History Museum has already included the ability to document pest infestations in relation to collection items and locations, and the actions taken to control and remove the infestation problem within our Condition Reports Module. We see the inclusion of pest trapping data within EMu as only a small step on from this.

My query is three-fold then.
1. What, and how are institutes recording pest trapping data as part of an IPM programme?
2. With my IPM Working Group hat on, I’d be interested to hear if anybody is using a spatial mapping software to analyse their pest data?
3. I’d be interested to see a ‘show of hands’ of organisations that would be interested in following my enquiries into whether EMu would be a viable option to document and analyse, both spatially and temporally, pest trapping data.

Thanks for your attention and I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards

Dave Smith
Petrology Curator, Mineralogy EMu administrator and co-chair of the IPMWG Visualisation Subgroup.
Natural History Museum, London.

Edited by: - 01-Jan-70 09:00:00

Dave Smith
Earth Sciences Data Manager
Natural History Museum, London

David Smith
Earth Sciences Data Manager
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Re: EMu and insect pest trapping data

Hi Dave,

In response to your message posted on 1.08.07, I coordinate the IPM program at Museum Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. This program sits in the conservation dept and is a cornerstone of preventive conservation activites at Museum Victoria. The program has been running for about 10 years with monitoring results/reports providing both spatial and temporal information relating to insect pest activity in collection storage areas over this time. However, our information is recorded on excel - none of this spatial mapping software stuff, but I would be very interested to hear more about it (and the potential of EMu to provide a similar recording platform).

We would be very interested in "keeping up" with your line of enquiry. Curently we use EMu to record IPM treatments such as freezing etc.

However, in answer to your questions:

1. We record pest trapping data in an excel format. The information recorded essentially documents pest species and number detected, location and if an artefact based infestation, which artefacts.

2. No, we are not using spatial mapping software.

3. Yes, we would be very interested in following your enquiries into the viability of EMu as an IPM recording tool.

Look forward to hearing from you.

Regards

David Coxsedge

IPM coordinator,
Conservation Dept
Museum Victoria,
Melbourne, Australia

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Re: EMu and insect pest trapping data

Pest Monitoring and EMu

Calling all curators, collections managers and conservators tackling the issue of insect pest damage to collections.

You maybe interested in a potential feature within EMu that could change the way you manage the problem.

By recording pest trapping data within EMu, in addition to creating the usual summary bar-charts to communicate the situation to colleagues and senior management, an EMu Object Locator report would display the data spatially on the plans of the museum. So not only would you see a record of numbers, you would see where in the museum they occur.
I have discussed this with KE and they have proposed a number of modifications to be able to effectively capture the pest monitoring data and display it in such a way that patterns, trends, hotspots and changing pest distributions can be observed. Details of these modifications and a visual representation of how the pest data would look can be found in either of the presentations I gave at the EMu User Group meetings this year.
I would recommend this presentation: http://www.kesoftware.com/downloads/EMu … -10-09.pps

with the associated notes (http://www.kesoftware.com/downloads/EMu … otes.doc).

One slide is blank - this is an AVI file illustrating the temporal change in the pest distribution, which didn't load, but can be found here (http://www.kesoftware.com/downloads/EMu … _2003.avi)
n.b. it may take a few minutes to download.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.
There has been much interest from institutes in UK, Australia and North America. I will also be starting a discussion thread to gain an understanding of what institutions might require if an IPM Module were to be specified.

Thanks

Dave Smith
Natural History Museum, London.

Dave Smith
Earth Sciences Data Manager
Natural History Museum, London

David Smith
Earth Sciences Data Manager
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